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Tornado Safety in a Car

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Many people in automobiles have been killed trying to outdrive a tornado

Many people in automobiles have been killed trying to outdrive a tornado

It’s time for yet another podcast of That Weather Show brought to you by the NOAA Weather Partners in Norman, Oklahoma. I’m Rachel Forsyth.

Fact or Myth? Hiding under an overpass is a safe shelter from a tornado. Stay tuned for the answer.

If you’re driving on the road and see a tornado or hear a tornado warning over the radio for your location, you need to seek shelter immediately. Park your vehicle as quickly and safely as possible, without blocking traffic. Get out and seek shelter in a nearby sturdy building. If you are in the open country, get to low ground or a ditch – away from cars and trees. Lie flat, face-down, and cover your head with your hands.

A tornado can easily lift a vehicle and toss it through the air, as was the case in the May 3, 1999 Oklahoma tornadoes.

A tornado can easily lift a vehicle and toss it through the air, as was the case in the May 3, 1999 Oklahoma tornadoes.

A tornado can easily lift a vehicle and toss it through the air. Many people have been killed while trying to outrun a tornado. Although it’s sometimes possible to flee the area, it’s generally not a good idea. You can run into problems like blocked roads or traffic jams. Plus, some tornadoes are wrapped in rain – making them difficult to see.

It’s very important to be prepared and stay alert to weather conditions – especially during times when severe weather is possible. Information about tornado watches and warnings are available from NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards.

Okay, now let’s go back to our question. Fact or Myth? Hiding under an overpass is a safe shelter from a tornado. It may seem safer than a ditch – but it’s just a myth. The winds from the tornado could cause serious injuries from the flying debris or even blow you out from your hiding spot. Seek shelter in a secure structure or low-lying area.

Thanks for listening to another podcast of That Weather Show brought to you by the NOAA Weather Partners in Norman, Oklahoma. I’m Rachel Forsyth.